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Business

Why you need to chuck Co-working and get a real office

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Do you want to quit co-working? Are you aware of the benefits of a real office? Co-working spaces offer many advantages for self-starters, networking opportunities, daily structure, increased productivity, flexibility and cost savings, remote access, enhanced productivity, reduces loneliness, breaking out of comfort zone, wellness, and work-life balance.

 It also allows you to work in a well-equipped office without the hassle of a long-term, expensive lease. But, overstaying your welcome at a co-working space is like overstaying your time at your parents, and it comes at a real cost. This experience is excellent, but with time, you start seeing advantages and disadvantages, and having your own space starts to look like a fantastic choice.

Everyone’s experience will be different, but here are three benefits of having your own office.

1. Quiet

In most cases, it’s about money. You are hitting 40, 50, or 60, and still sharing space becomes a lot less practical. But there are also the obvious environmental factors and downsides, including noise and lack of privacy. While most workers are great and friendly, everyone can be affected by each other’s business cycle.

When everyone is loud, it’s hard to be productive. All you need maybe a quiet and peaceful environment. Co-workers who are introverts prefer to work alone, always much of their workday. And the reverse is also true: extroverts often also enjoy socializing in small groups. Although most need solitary work time, they don’t want to be alone all day long.

Without basing much on psychological theory, we all know some of us need more quiet time than others to thrive.

Quiet spaces may be significant for workers who classify themselves as introverts, but soft areas tend to benefit everyone else. With co-working, you don’t have enough private space for groups to form a collaboration. Eventually, it starts to impact your workflow as you need access to the dedicated place where people can think, brainstorm, meet, or make important phone calls.

2. It’s Cheaper to get your own space

Co-working is convenient. Though it doesn’t come cheap, If you’ve just got a few employees, it makes sense from a financial standpoint. It just means you are not paying for a whole office and all the associated expenses. Instead, you’re just renting a few desks, often month-by-month. But once the business begins to take off, you can get more quality furniture for your office, and you suddenly realize you would be saving a lot of money by getting your own space.

When you reach a point where leasing your own office becomes cheaper than sharing space, it will vary depending on your business’s local real estate market and demands. Then, there are all the additional expenses to consider, from utilities to that must-have coffee machine, kitchen utilities such as a water dispenser, microwave, and files. Doing some quick math should give you an idea of when it’s time to ditch the co-working space and get your place.

3. In a co-working space, your culture takes a hit.

It’s hard for employees to feel proud or a real sense of ownership and investment in a Co-working space. Worse, you never settle; hence you find yourself leasing different areas in less than a year or so. It’s like letting an apartment and sleeping in somebody else’s bed, sitting on somebody else’s sofa, or looking at someone’s art. Something feels a bit off.

When you start on your own, you get a chance to build something that reflects who you are and your company.

Not to mention, your culture can’t blossom when it’s always surrounded by other companies and their unique vibe and values. Psychologically, it is crucial that you get your own space as a testament to how far you have come but, more importantly, as a testament to how far you could go.

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